Ancient Greeks I

  • 0/5 Stars
Medium:
Syllabus
Course Level:
100
Course Length:
15 weeks
Credits:
3
Tags:

Required Texts

Aeschylus.  The Oresteia, Agamemnon, The Libation Bearers, The Eumenides.
Trans. Robert Fagles. Penguin Classics
New York: Penguin books, 1979

Aesop. The Complete Fables.
Trans. Olivia  and Robert Temple. Penguin Classics
New York: Penguin Books, 1998

Aristophanes. Four Plays:  The Clouds, The Birds, Lysistrata, The Frogs.
Trans. William Arrowsmith, Richard Lattimore and Douglass Parker. Meridian Books.
New York: Penguin Books, 1994 

Hawthorne, Nathaniel. A Wonder-Book for Girls and Boys. Everyman’s Library.
New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1997

Herodotus. The Histories. Trans. George Rawlinson. Everymen’s Library
New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1997

Homer. The Odyssey. Trans. Robert Fagles.
Penguin Classics. New York. 2006

Plato. Five Dialogues: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Phaedo.
Trans. G.M.A. Grube, rev. by John M. Cooper, Second Edition,
Indianapolis: Hackett, 2002

Plato. The Republic.  Trans. Allan Bloom. Second Edition.
N.P.: Basic Books, 1991.

Course Description

What does it mean to be a human person?  Humanities 101 begins a conversation about this question based on readings from Greek authors of literature, history and philosophy.  Through stories, epics, drama and poetry, students begin to imagine, feel and understand the foundation of their culture.  Greek history introduces students to events and characters that begin the story of Western Civilization.  Through reading Plato’s dialogues, students participate in the great questions and answers about reality and  human life.  The general thrust of these studies is to enable students to understand what it is to be a citizen of Western Civilization.

N.B. For a more comprehensive description of the Humanities Curriculum, consult WCC’s Catalog and Handbook, “Humanities Curriculum.”

Student Outcomes

Through readings, conversations, class lectures and poetry memorization, students will:

  • Imagine how the ancient Greeks saw our world through fables, epic poetry, tragedy and comedy.
  • Think and converse about the questions, themes and emotions that were important to the Greeks such as home, family, justice, religion, freedom, education, love and death.
  • Begin to understand the story of philosophy through an introduction to the ideas of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle.
  • Learn how to read imaginative literature, history and philosophy with greater facility and understanding.
  • Grow in wonder at the truth, beauty and goodness of the greatest writers of ancient Greece.
  • Develop each student’s powers of sense awareness, imagination, emotion and memory.  WCC students will learn by heart, with the help of the teacher acting as a coach, forty-four poems in the nine humanities classes over four years.
  • Understand the horizontal and vertical integration of the basic disciplines of liberal education.  Understanding this integration will hone an appreciation of tradition and help students see the entire body of knowledge as an integral whole.

Required Coursework

Students must:

  • Complete all reading assignments in a conscientious, thoughtful and timely manner.  Weekly reading assignments are to be completed as of the dates indicated in the reading schedule.
  • Attend all classes.  Attendance at all classes is required unless the student is  ill or some unforeseen difficulty  arises.  The student must contact the professor as soon as possible if he or she will be absent.
  • Arrive at class on time.  It is highly disruptive, as well as discourteous, to the class if a student habitually comes late to class.
  • Write three required essays.  These papers will be comprehensive essays that require students to integrate the knowledge they have acquired about the texts.  These paper will be due on October 5, November 2, and November 18. You will receive the prompt at least two weeks in advance.
  • Students should follow the English handbook used in the Trivium curriculum regarding all questions concerning style and grammar.
  • Do the take-home, short-writing assignments.  Complete all in-class quizzes.  These reinforce the lectures, conversations and the habit of reading carefully.
  • Participate in class conversations.

Class Participation Grade

By an ‘A’ in class participation is meant that a student is clearly attentive and spontaneously contributes excellent comments that significantly promote the good of the class and allow the instructor to readily assess how well the material is grasped.

By a ‘B’ is meant all the above, but not as consistently or vigorously: the student contributes less often or with less insight, making it more difficult for the instructor to assess how well the material is grasped; the contributions advance the good of the class but not to the same extent.

By a ‘C’ is meant that a student seems attentive but rarely or never speaks unless called upon, yet is able to give a pertinent answer; as a result, his contribution to the good of the class is negligible and the instructor cannot easily assess how well the material is grasped.

By a ‘D’ is meant that a student is barely fulfilling the requirements of class participation: he does not demonstrate attentiveness, is unwilling to offer answers unless called upon, and, when called upon, makes superficial or marginally relevant remarks.

By an ‘F’ is meant that a student fails to show any significant indications of taking class presence and participation seriously.

Evaluation Process

The following forms of assessment will be used:

  • Thoughtful participation in all classes is encouraged and expected since one of the purposes of the class is to foster intelligent conversation.
  • The essays will evaluate the student’s ability to read with penetration and form the results of his or her reading into a well-ordered presentation.
  • Objective examinations over each major reading allows the professor to assess how well students have retained materials from the entire semester and how well theyhave grasped the unity of the material covered.
  • Quizzes motivate students to prepare well for each class. Student recitation of poetry will be on one of the quizzes.
Grading:

Class participation -  20%
Essays - 30%
Quizzes and exams - 25%
Final Exam - 25%

Plagiarism Statement

Read through this statement carefully.  Ask questions if there is anything you do not understand.

While it is normal and praiseworthy for students to offer help to each other or to seek help in their studies, particularly in the brainstorming or reviewing stages, it is quite a different matter when a student does another student’s work for him or alternatively, copies another’s work. Plagiarism is an act of intellectual dishonesty; therefore, it is academically unethical and unacceptable to do any of the following acts:

  • To submit an essay written in whole or in part by another student as if it were your own;
  • To download an essay from the internet, then quote or paraphrase from it, in whole or in part, without acknowledging the original source;
  • To  paraphrase part of another writer’s work without acknowledging the source;
  • To reproduce the substance of another writer’s argument and re-submit it to another teacher;
  • To cheat on tests or quizzes through the use of crib sheets, hidden notes, viewing another student’s paper, revealing the answers on your own paper to another student through verbal or textual communication, sign language, or other means of storing and communicating information;
  • To copy another student’s homework and submit the work as if it were the product of your own labor.

Committing any of these acts of academic dishonesty entails some form of punishment, such as a failing grade for the assignment or quiz, failure in the class as a whole, or even expulsion from this college.

Assignment Schedule

 

Class Discussion

Assignment

Number of Pages

1

Introduction

None

 

2

Aesop’s Fables

pp. 1-77

77

3

Aesop’s Fables

78-170

92

4

A Wonder Book

17-130

113

5

Odyssey I-IV

77-151

74

6

Odyssey V-VIII

152-210

58

7

Odyssey IX-XII

211-285

74

8

Odyssey XIII-XVI

286-353

67

9

Odyssey XVII-XX

354-423

69

10

Odyssey XXI-XXIV

424-485

61

11

Plato: Euthyphro

1-20

19

12

Plato: Apology and Crito

21-57

36

13

Plutarch; Lives, Vol. 1

2-128 and 146-170

50+54+46

14

Plutarch: Lives, Vol. 1

201-234

33

15

Aristophanes: the Clouds

21-110

89

16

Aristophanes: the Clouds

111-147

31

17

Aeschylus: Agamemnon

103-172

36

18

Aeschylus: the Libation Bearers

177-226

69

19

Aeschylus: the Eumenides

231-277

46

20

Herodotus: Histories, Book 1

5-76

70

21

Herodotus: Histories, Book 1, 6, 7

77-112; 462; 505-536

66

22

Herodotus: Histories Book 7

557-608

51

23

Herodotus: Books 8 and 9

637-656

39

24

Plato: Republic Books I and II

3-61

58

25

Plato: Republic Books III and IV

63-125

62

26

Plato: Republic, Books V and VI

126-192

65