Professional Development

Part IV (of V): Sertillanges' The Intellectual Life: Ite ad Thomam
By Thaddeus Kozinski on October 18, 2010

For Sertillanges, philosophy and theology are not just for philosophers and theologians. For they are the queen and divine sciences respectively, and where either is absent or neglected or misapprehended in the intellectual life, the other sciences that are present, cultivated, and apprehended will suffer.

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Is Political Science Really Irrelevant?
By Gabriel Martinez on October 15, 2010

By the way, Schumpeter himself could not do math to save his life.  So there's hope for all of us.

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Are Bibliophiles a Dying Breed?
By Anonymous on October 15, 2010

As a result of common pronouncements about the end of books and my own love of the same, I have been thinking about the future of books and libraries.  I offer the following as some optimistic opinions about the future of books, libraries, and bibliophilism.

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Who Adds the Greatest Value to the Economy?: The Laborer, the CEO, or the Philosopher? Part Two
By John von Heyking on October 13, 2010

Our society tends to regard the university professor of liberal education as parasitic to the wealth creation of the laborer and CEO.  This false view neglects the moral economy in which each of them participates, and to which each adds his own unique value.

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Who Adds the Greatest Value to the Economy?: The Laborer, the CEO, or the Philosopher?
By John von Heyking on October 06, 2010

A common perception in our society has it that people who create wealth directly, such as the businessman or the laborer who works with his hands, produce more wealth than a university professor, who is seen as a parasite on their efforts. The university professor, especially one who teaches humanities and social sciences and thus does not invent some machine that enhances industrial production, produces nothing of value.  It’s even worse if he teaches at a public institution, because then he draws his inflated salary from the backs of those who actually work for a living. A recent encounter of mine challenges this perception in a fundamental way.

Part One of Two

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The Echo Chamber Syndrome Disarmed
By Gerson Moreno-Riano on October 04, 2010

At the most recent meeting of the American Political Science Association (APSA), the Lehrman American Studies Center sponsored two faculty initiatives: a short course and a working group on the topic of statesmanship and democracy.  Both of these efforts are part of a substantive set of initiatives on the part of the Center to reach audiences beyond its traditional constituency.  It is great to report that both efforts were quite successful.

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Mediocrity Happens
By Gabriel Martinez on October 04, 2010

Mediocrity happens. At this very moment at an institution of higher education near you, a mildly hung-over student is finishing a mildly plagiarized paper on travel-industry marketing, for which he'll receive a B-plus. Across campus, an assistant professor is drafting a tepid scholarly article that will eventually be read by 43 people and cited by one.

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Week 4: Reflections on Students, by a New Teacher
By Joseph Stuart on September 30, 2010

There are few professions in which one can interact in such a healthy way with young people. Though the life of a university teacher is full of work day in and day out, including weekends, I get to do what I love: converse about ideas and books!

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Part III (of V): Sertillanges' The Intellectual Life: On Depth and Breadth
By Thaddeus Kozinski on September 27, 2010

When, what, and how to study? In what spirit? How, and how much, to sow the seeds of reading and memory to reap a fruitful harvest of creative production?  How to strike the right balance between life qua intellectual and life qua human being?

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A Liberal-Arts Assessment Tool?
By Gabriel Martinez on September 27, 2010

That's what the promoters of the Collegiate Learning Assessment think they have been promoting

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